Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England

From Flips and Rattle-Skulls to Switchel and Spruce Beer

Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children's lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World's abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns--watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today..

Distilled in Maine

A History of Libations, Temperance & Craft Spirits

Distilled in Maine

Early Maine ran on sweet and fiery New England rum. Later, rapid industrial advances and ever-present drinking opportunities made daily life unnecessarily hazardous. Overindulgence triggered a severe backlash, a fierce temperance movement and eighty-two years of prohibition in the Pine Tree State. While the coastal state never really dried out, the Maine Law sent both serious and social drinking under the table for the better part of a century. Liquor crafted in Maine has slowly and quietly remade itself into a respected drink, imbued with history and representing the best of the state's ingenuity and self-reliance. Contemporary distillers across the state are concocting truly local spirits while creative bartenders are mixing the new and old, bringing back the art of a fine drink. Join Portland food writer Kate McCarty on a spirited romp through the evolution of Maine's relationship with alcohol.

Haunted Inns and Ghostly Getaways of Vermont

Haunted Inns and Ghostly Getaways of Vermont

Prepare to be disturbed by the preternatural guests at the Green Mountain State’s most creeptastic lodgings—from the author of Haunted Burlington. Creaks and groans in the night remind guests that they might not be alone in Vermont’s inns. Discover the history behind some of the Green Mountain State’s spookiest places to spend the night. Loyal guest Mary Todd Lincoln enjoyed her annual respites at the Equinox Hotel in Manchester so much that death could not interrupt the tradition. Some still feel the presence of Al Capone in the underground bar he favored at Highgate Manor. The show goes on for the ghost of tap-dancing hero Boots Berry at Stowe’s Green Mountain Inn. Queen City Ghostwalk creator and author Thea Lewis shares chilling encounters and examines the spirits of the past that are not quite resting in peace. Haunted Inns and Ghostly Getaways of Vermont is the only bedtime story for a night in Vermont’s eerie lodgings. Includes photos! “For Lewis, a gifted storyteller, a good story makes a haunted place all the more compelling.” —Happy Vermont

Intemperate Spirits

Economic Adaptation during Prohibition

Intemperate Spirits

Using the basic economic principle of making decisions using a cost-benefit framework—and how changes in one or the other can result in a different decision—this book uncovers how various groups responded to incentives provided by the Prohibition legislation. Using this calculus, it is clear that even criminals are rational characters, responding to incentives and opportunities provided by the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act. The book begins with a broad look at the adaptations of the law’s targets: the wine, beer, and liquor industries. It then turns to specific people (Violators, Line Tip-Toers, Enablers, and Hypocrites), sharing their stories of economic adaptation to bring economic lessons to life. Due to its structure, the book can be read in parts or as a whole and is suitable for short classroom reading assignments or individual pleasure reading.

A Thyme to Discover

Early American Recipes for the Modern Table

A Thyme to Discover

Revive your inner pilgrim and master the art of colonial cooking with sixty recipes celebrating America's earliest days! From their voyage on the Mayflower to the days of the American Revolution, early American settlers struggled to survive in the New World. Join us as we travel through time and discover how our forefathers fed their families and grew a nation, from eating nuts and berries to preparing fantastic feasts of seafood and venison, and learn how you can cook like them, too! With gorgeous and whimsical hand-drawn illustrations from beginning to end, A Thyme to Discover, spanning the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, is an illustrated historical cookbook for foodies, history buffs, and Americans alike. Cohen and Graves reimagine old original colonial recipes from pilgrims, presidents, and Native Americans, and modify them to suit modern palates and tastes. Arranged chronologically as the English settlers cooked and ate their way into becoming Americans, these deliciously historical recipes include: The First Thanksgiving, 1621: "Venison over Wild Rice Cakes" and "Pumpkin Pudding with Rum Sauce" Alexander Hamilton's "Beef Stew with Apple Brandy" and Abraham Lincoln's "Chicken Fricasee" Rhode Island's "Bacon-Kissed Clam Cakes" and Massachusett's "Chowdahhhhh" Forefather's Day, 1749: "Sufferin' Succcotash with Buttered Lobster" Jim Beam's "Bourbon Oatmeal Raisin Cookies" And many more! Including a "Tipsy Timeline" of New World alcoholic beverages, the menus of the oldest taverns in America, and other bite-sized tidbits to satiate your curiosity and hunger, A Thyme to Discover revives forgotten culinary traditions and keeps them alive, on your own dinner table.

The New England Soul

Preaching and Religious Culture in Colonial New England

The New England Soul

"Both the sources he employs and the scope of his study set his work apart from all that have precede it...The first study of New England preaching to span the entire colonial period...very important book." - Journal of American History "Simply breathtaking in scope. No one else has dared to grapple with the full sweep of Puritan preaching form the founding of New England through the American Revolution." - Nathan O. Hatch, University of Notre Dame "A massive achievement will stand as the definitive work on this important subject." - Reviews in American History "Impressive, imaginative, sensible, and lucid." - Donald G. Matthews, University of North Carolina and Chapel Hill "[Stout] has created a field of scholarship hitherto neglected - the manuscript sermon as a source of religious culture in colonial times. More than that, he has shown the extent to which sermon notes add to our knowledge of the times, notably for the period of the Great Awakening. And he has done so with great insight." - New England Quarterly "So soundly based on exhaustive research and so lucid in presentation, that even its most surprising conclusions carry conviction. An impressive achievement." - Daniel Walker Howe, author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 "One of the most impressive studies of Puritan New England society to appear in this century....Throughout the work, Stout enriches, supplements and revises much of the current knowledge about colonial New England. His language, which is both precise and playful, makes the volume a delight to read." -The Historian "Will surely become a benchmark in the study of early American history and culture." -Journal of the American Academy of Religion

The Forgotten Nature of New England

A Search for Traces of the Original Wilderness

The Forgotten Nature of New England

By trekking hundreds of miles, everywhere asking about legendary natural features or curiosities, Dean Bennett discovered an intriguing array of places where the" original" New England remains -- unusual, often beautiful, sometimes awe-inspiring, and ever fascinating. Pockets of old growth forest stand unharvested. Caves and dinosaur footprints and half-forgotten curiosities such as Devil's Foot Rock lie hidden. Undammed rivers form spectacular waterfalls. Rare animals and plants maintain toeholds here and there. Bennett's book shows you all of these and more.