Remembering Our Childhood

How Memory Betrays Us

Remembering Our Childhood

In a number of highly-charged child abuse cases, teachers and parents have been wrongfully arrested because of claims of 'recovered memory'. But brain science is now discovering how memories can alter, or even be planted by leading questions. Sabbagh explains the latest findings, and argues that courts must be guided by them.

Raising Children Soul to Soul: Discovering Our Lost Childhood

Raising Children Soul to Soul: Discovering Our Lost Childhood

Children raised with awareness and energy enlightenment are amazing individuals. They have a superior comprehension of life, business, and energy even at a young age, and they quickly learn how to create innovative, successful outcomes. They mature early, and their grasp of life and what it offers them is breathtaking. The key to opening the door to illumination in childrearing is to understand your own childhood. This book offers an open-ended invitation to rediscover childhood memories and explore its wisdom. It interprets your first seven years as a vital chapter in this your lifetime. It also explains the spiritual context of how your first cycle from birth to seven years forms the basis for all future programming, including parenting. Presenting an innovative concept with a practical approach to parenting, Raising Children Soul to Soul presents an alternative method with more spiritual connotations. It gives parents the opportunity to shortcut their children's journey to spiritual maturity.

Stories from a Small Town

Remembering My Childhood in Hedgesville, West Virginia

Stories from a Small Town

Take a moment and picture your childhood home. Try to visualize a short walk from your doorstep. Can you conjure up your neighborhood, nearby houses or businesses, and the people who lived or worked in them? Can you recall the events that unfolded nearby, or the activities that once filled your childhood world? Roger Engle took this mental journey throughout his hometown, and in doing so, rediscovered his childhood around every corner. Stories from a Small Town places us in Hedgesville, West Virginia, between the years of 1948 and 1964, and encourages us to meander there at a pace governed by the whimsy of a child. Mr. Engle takes us along on his adventures around town and into the surrounding wilderness, and provides an unfettered and rather amusing view into the life domestic. With tenderness and grit, he reveals both the challenges and opportunities of growing up in a working-class family during self-sufficient times. Stories from a Small Town offers us a delightfully vivid portrait of childhood, and may very well inspire us to remember, document, and share with future generations the stories of our own lives--while we are still able.

Lessons from the Porch

A Gathering Place for Telling Our Stories

Lessons from the Porch

Lessons from the Porch is Ed Poole's thoughtful memoir of life's lessons, which he shares with endearing charm and good-natured heart. The book is a thoughtful journey and an engaging reminiscence. Lessons from the Porch will allow the reader to consider questions such as: Have you wondered how you arrived at your current stop along your journey? Have you ever asked the question, "What am I supposed to be learning from this experience?" How can I leave this world a bit better than it was when I found it? Although written about his own experience battling depression, the book is meant for anyone embarking on a journey to know themselves and cultivate new friendships. We all have places from which we learn life's lessons. For some it may be sitting beside a meandering stream. For this author, the place to which he returned to understand his journey was the porch that surrounded his house as he grew up. Metaphorically, Poole's porch represents how he either has or has not accepted changes in his life. The dilemma about how and when to leave his porch goes back to his early boyhood when his mom would always say, "Eddie, don't get too close to the edge of the porch, because you might fall off."

Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home

Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home

Using an innovative auto-ethnographic approach to investigate the otherness of the places that make up the childhood home and its neighbourhood in relation to memory-derived and memory-imbued cultural geographies, Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home is concerned with childhood spaces and children's perspectives of those spaces and, consequentially, with the personalised locations that make up the childhood family home and its immediate surroundings (such as the garden, the street, etc.). Whilst this book is primarily structured by the author's memories of living in his own Welsh childhood home during the 1970s - that is, the auto-ethnographic framework - it is as much about living anywhere amid the remembered cultural remnants of the past as it is immersing oneself in cultural geographies of the here-and-now. As a result, Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home is part of the ongoing pursuit by cultural geographers to provide a personal exploration of the pluralities of shared landscapes, whereby such an engagement with space and place aid our construction of cognitive maps of meaning that, in turn, manifest themselves as both individual and collective cultural experiences. Furthermore, touching upon our co-habiting of ghost topologies, Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home also encourages a critical exploration of children’s spirituality amid the haunted cultural and geographical spaces and places of a house and its neighbourhood: the cellar, hallway, parlour, stairs, bedroom, attic, shops, cemeteries, and so on.

Remembering Childhood in the Middle East

Memoirs from a Century of Change

Remembering Childhood in the Middle East

Growing up is a universal experience, but the particularities of homeland, culture, ethnicity, religion, family, and so on make every childhood unique. To give Western readers insight into what growing up in the Middle East was like in the twentieth century, this book gathers thirty-six original memoirs written by Middle Eastern men and women about their own childhoods. Elizabeth Warnock Fernea, a well-known writer of books and documentary films about women and the family in the Middle East, has collected stories of childhoods spent in Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and Turkey. The accounts span the entire twentieth century, a full range of ethnicities and religions, and the social spectrum from aristocracy to peasantry. They are grouped by eras, for which Fernea provides a concise historical sketch, and include a brief biography of each contributor. The introduction by anthropologist Robert A. Fernea sets the memoirs in the larger context of Middle Eastern life and culture. As a collection, the memoirs offer an unprecedented opportunity to look at the same period in history in the same region of the world from a variety of very different remembered experiences. At times dramatic, humorous, or tragic, and always deeply felt, the memoirs document the diversity and richness of people's lives in the modern Middle East.

A Werewolf Problem in Central Russia and Other Stories

A Werewolf Problem in Central Russia and Other Stories

Satirical stories by a Russian writer. The story, Vera Pavlovna's Ninth Dream, is on the transition from communism to capitalism as experienced by the cleaner of a public toilet, Bulldozer Driver's Day is on a hydrogen bomb assembly line, while The Ontology of Childhood compares childhood to prison. By the author of The Blue Lantern.

Na Pua Alii O Kauai

Ruling Chiefs of Kauaì

Na Pua Alii O Kauai

Chronicles Kauai's rich history, tracing the legends of rulers on the island, as well as stories about voyages, warfare, and romances from the past two thousand years.

Autodafe

A Manual for Intellectual Survival

Autodafe

Volume three of urgent political writing from a worldwide association of literary activists.

The Generation of Postmemory

Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust

The Generation of Postmemory

Can we remember other people's memories? The Generation of Postmemory argues we can: that memories of traumatic events live on to mark the lives of those who were not there to experience them. Children of survivors and their contemporaries inherit catastrophic histories not through direct recollection but through haunting postmemories multiply mediated images, objects, stories, behaviors, and affects passed down within the family and the culture at large. In these new and revised critical readings of the literary and visual legacies of the Holocaust and other, related sites of memory, Marianne Hirsch builds on her influential concept of postmemory. The book's chapters, two of which were written collaboratively with the historian Leo Spitzer, engage the work of postgeneration artists and writers such as Art Spiegelman, W.G. Sebald, Eva Hoffman, Tatana Kellner, Muriel Hasbun, Anne Karpff, Lily Brett, Lorie Novak, David Levinthal, Nancy Spero and Susan Meiselas. Grappling with the ethics of empathy and identification, these artists attempt to forge a creative postmemorial aesthetic that reanimates the past without appropriating it. In her analyses of their fractured texts, Hirsch locates the roots of the familial and affiliative practices of postmemory in feminism and other movements for social change. Using feminist critical strategies to connect past and present, words and images, and memory and gender, she brings the entangled strands of disparate traumatic histories into more intimate contact. With more than fifty illustrations, her text enables a multifaceted encounter with foundational and cutting edge theories in memory, trauma, gender, and visual culture, eliciting a new understanding of history and our place in it.