Selected Subaltern Studies

Selected Subaltern Studies

This provocative volume presents the most wide-ranging essays from the first five volumes of Subaltern Studies, along with an introductory essay by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak--the translator of Derrida's Of Grammatology into English--and a foreword by eminent critic Edward W. Said. Addressed to students and scholars throughout the humanities, these essays address what Antonio Gramsci--the founder of the Italian communist party--called the subaltern classes, reexamining well-known historical and political events, such as Gandhi's role in India, from a Marxist perspective. Together, the essays examine aspects of the analysis of domination, with special reference to the critique of imperialism, in an attempt to rectify the elitist bias characteristic of much academic work on India. A ground-breaking work of considerable pedagogical relevance for courses dealing with colonialism and imperialism in literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, and history, Subaltern Studies also features a comprehensive glossary of Indian terms for readers not familiar with Indian history.

Mapping Subaltern Studies and the Postcolonial

Mapping Subaltern Studies and the Postcolonial

This newest volume in the Mappings Series offers the first comprehensive balance-sheet of the Subaltern Studies Project, an intervention in South Asian history and politics, which has recently generated a powerful impact in Latin American, Irish, and African Studies. Initially inspired by Antonio Gramsci's writings on the history of subaltern classes, the Subaltern Studies authors adopted a "history from below" paradigm to contest "elite" history writing of Indian nationalists, from the left and right. Later the Project shifted away from its social history origins by drawing upon eclectic thinkers such as Edward Said, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida. Brought together in these pages are classic essays and trenchant criticism from authors such as David Arnold, C. A. Bayly, Tom Brass, Partha Chatterjee, Ranajit Guha, Rosalind O'Hanlon, Gyanendra Pandey, Gyan Prakash, Sumit Sarkar, Gayatri Spivak and David Washbrook.

History After the Three Worlds

Post-Eurocentric Historiographies

History After the Three Worlds

This ambitious volume provides a comparative perspective on the challenges facing the discipline of history as Eurocentrism fades as a lens for viewing the world. Exploring the state of history and the struggle over its ownership throughout the world, the authors address the issues of globalization, postmodernism, and postcolonialism that have been largely ignored by practicing historians despite their importance to cultural studies and their relevance to history. Engaging in a vigorous critique of Eurocentrism, the volume at the same time reaffirms the importance of historical ways of knowing.

A Subaltern Studies Reader, 1986-1995

A Subaltern Studies Reader, 1986-1995

The Subaltern Studies Collective, founded in 1982, was begun with the goal of examining the subsequent history of colonized countries. This new group of essays from the Collective's founders chart the course of subaltern history from early peasant revolts and insurgency to more complex processes of domination and subordination in a variety of changing institutions and practices.

Can the Subaltern Speak?

Reflections on the History of an Idea

Can the Subaltern Speak?

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's original essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" transformed the analysis of colonialism through an eloquent and uncompromising argument that affirmed the contemporary relevance of Marxism while using deconstructionist methods to explore the international division of labor and capitalism's "worlding" of the world. Spivak's essay hones in on the historical and ideological factors that obstruct the possibility of being heard for those who inhabit the periphery. It is a probing interrogation of what it means to have political subjectivity, to be able to access the state, and to suffer the burden of difference in a capitalist system that promises equality yet withholds it at every turn. Since its publication, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" has been cited, invoked, imitated, and critiqued. In these phenomenal essays, eight scholars take stock of the effects and response to Spivak's work. They begin by contextualizing the piece within the development of subaltern and postcolonial studies and the quest for human rights. Then, through the lens of Spivak's essay, they rethink historical problems of subalternity, voicing, and death. A final section situates "Can the Subaltern Speak?" within contemporary issues, particularly new international divisions of labor and the politics of silence among indigenous women of Guatemala and Mexico. In an afterword, Spivak herself considers her essay's past interpretations and future incarnations and the questions and histories that remain secreted in the original and revised versions of "Can the Subaltern Speak?" both of which are reprinted in this book.

Deconstruction

Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies

Deconstruction

Contains essays discussing deconstruction by such authors as Jacques Derrida, Paul de Man, and Barbara Johnson.

The Spivak Reader

Selected Works of Gayati Chakravorty Spivak

The Spivak Reader

Among the foremost feminist critics to have emerged to international eminence over the last fifteen years, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak has relentlessly challenged the high ground of established theoretical discourse in literary and cultural studies. Although her rigorous reading of various authors has often rendered her work difficult terrain for those unfamiliar with poststructuralism, this collection makes significant strides in explicating Spivak's complicated theories of reading.

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Economic Geography

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Economic Geography

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Economic Geography presents students and researchers with a comprehensive overview of the field, put together by a prestigious editorial team, with contributions from an international cast of prominent scholars. Offers a fully revised, expanded, and up-to-date overview, following the successful and highly regarded Companion to Economic Geography published by Blackwell a decade earlier, providing a comprehensive assessment of the field Takes a prospective as well as retrospective look at the field, reviewing recent developments, recurrent challenges, and emerging agendas Incorporates diverse perspectives (in terms of specialty, demography and geography) of up and coming scholars, going beyond a focus on Anglo-American research Encourages authors and researchers to engage with and contextualize their situated perspectives Explores areas of overlap, dialogues, and (potential) engagement between economic geography and cognate disciplines

The Postcolonial Gramsci

The Postcolonial Gramsci

The importance of Antonio Gramsci’s work for postcolonial studies can hardly be exaggerated, and in this volume, contributors situate Gramsci's work in the vast and complex oeuvre of postcolonial studies. Specifically, this book endeavors to reassess the impact on postcolonial studies of the central role assigned by Gramsci to culture and literature in the formation of a truly revolutionary idea of the national—a notion that has profoundly shaped the thinking of both Frantz Fanon and Edward Said. Gramsci, as Iain Chambers has argued, has been instrumental in helping scholars rethink their understanding of historical, political, and cultural struggle by substituting the relationship between tradition and modernity with that of subaltern versus hegemonic parts of the world. Combining theoretical reflections and re-interpretations of Gramsci, the scholars in this collection present comparative geo-cultural perspectives on the meaning of the subaltern, passive revolution, hegemony, and the concept of national-popular culture in order to chart out a political map of the postcolonial through the central focus on Gramsci.

Subaltern studies

writings on South Asian history and society

Subaltern studies

Contributed articles and some papers presented at the Conference on Subalternity and Culture, held at Hyderabad in January 1993.