The Brass Bottle

A Farcical Fantastic Play in Four Acts

The Brass Bottle

"The Brass Bottle" by F. Anstey. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Brass Bottle

Large Print

The Brass Bottle

"This day six weeks--just six weeks ago!" Horace Ventimore said, half aloud, to himself, and pulled out his watch. "Half-past twelve--what was I doing at half-past twelve?"As he sat at the window of his office in Great Cloister Street, Westminster, he made his thoughts travel back to a certain glorious morning in August which now seemed so remote and irrecoverable. At this precise time he was waiting on the balcony of the Hôtel de la Plage--the sole hostelry of St. Luc-en-Port, the tiny Normandy watering-place upon which, by some happy inspiration, he had lighted during a solitary cycling tour--waiting until She should appear.He could see the whole scene: the tiny cove, with the violet shadow of the cliff sleeping on the green water; the swell of the waves lazily lapping against the diving-board from which he had plunged half an hour before; he remembered the long swim out to the buoy; the exhilarated anticipation with which he had dressed and climbed the steep path to the hotel terrace.

The Brass Bottle

The Brass Bottle

A djinn, sealed in a jar for three thousand years, has been found by Horace Ventimore, a young and not very flourishing architect. Upon his release the djinn expresses his gratitude by seeking to grant his benefactor's every wish--generally with results the very opposite to those desired!

The Brass Bottle Illustrated

The Brass Bottle Illustrated

The Brass Bottle is a 1900 novel by Thomas Anstey Guthrie under the pen name F. Anstey. It had three film adaptations

The Brass Bottle Illustrated

The Brass Bottle Illustrated

The Brass Bottle is a 1900 comedy novel by the British writer Thomas Anstey Guthrie, under the pen name of F. Anstey, about a man who awakens a genie. In a much later review George Orwell praised the work, and noted how strong an influence it had on William Aubrey Darlington's 1920 work Alf's Button.

The Brass Bottle Annotated

The Brass Bottle Annotated

The Brass Bottle is a 1900 comedy novel by the British writer Thomas Anstey Guthrie, under the pen name of F. Anstey, about a man who awakens a genie. In a much later review George Orwell praised the work, and noted how strong an influence it had on William Aubrey Darlington's 1920 work Alf's Button.

The Brass Bottle: Large Print

The Brass Bottle: Large Print

A djinn, sealed in a jar for three thousand years, has been found by Horace Ventimore, a young and not very flourishing architect. Upon his release the djinn expresses his gratitude by seeking to grant his benefactor's every wish--generally with results the very opposite to those desired!

The Brass Bottle (Annotated)

The Brass Bottle (Annotated)

The Brass Bottle is a 1900 comedy novel by the British writer Thomas Anstey Guthrie, under the pen name of F. Anstey, about a man who awakens a genie. In a much later review George Orwell praised the work, and noted how strong an influence it had on William Aubrey Darlington's 1920 work Alf's Button.

American Silent Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Feature Films, 1913–1929

American Silent Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Feature Films, 1913–1929

During the Silent Era, when most films dealt with dramatic or comedic takes on the “boy meets girl, boy loses girl” theme, other motion pictures dared to tackle such topics as rejuvenation, revivication, mesmerism, the supernatural and the grotesque. A Daughter of the Gods (1916), The Phantom of the Opera (1925), The Magician (1926) and Seven Footprints to Satan (1929) were among the unusual and startling films containing story elements that went far beyond the realm of “highly unlikely.” Using surviving documentation and their combined expertise, the authors catalog and discuss these departures from the norm in this encyclopedic guide to American horror, science fiction and fantasy in the years from 1913 through 1929.