The Building of Renaissance Florence

An Economic and Social History

The Building of Renaissance Florence

Awarded the Howard R. Marraro Prize by the American Historical Association "Always fascinating... The reader will get from Goldthwaite's book on the economics of architecture a more lively and more authentic impression of life in Renaissance Florence than from many more general descriptions of Florentine culture." -- Felix Gilbert, New York Review of Books.

The Economy of Renaissance Florence

The Economy of Renaissance Florence

Clarifies and explains the complex workings of Florence's commercial, banking, and artisan sectors. This book focuses on the urban economy of Florence itself, including various industries, merchants, artisans, and investors.

Wealth and the Demand for Art in Italy, 1300-1600

Wealth and the Demand for Art in Italy, 1300-1600

Wealth and the Demand for Art in Italy represents a departure from previous studies, both in its focus on demand and in its emphasis on the history of the material culture of the West. By demonstrating that the roots of modern consumer society can be found in Renaissance Italy, Richard Goldthwaite offers a significant contribution to the growing body of literature on the history of modern consumerism—a movement which he regards as a positive force for the formation of new attitudes about things that is a defining characteristic of modern culture.

Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

Essays illustrate the ways Renaissance Florentines expressed or shaped their identities as they interacted with their society.

Banks, Palaces, and Entrepreneurs in Renaissance Florence

Banks, Palaces, and Entrepreneurs in Renaissance Florence

This book gathers together Goldthwaiteís studies of various aspects of the world of the entrepreneur in 15th - century Florence. The subjects of these papers range from the formal education of businessmen in schools of commercial arithmetic to their operations as international bankers, and from the private householder that shaped some of their economic interests (including building a home) to the public urban scene in which they conducted business with one another. A general concern with the way social structures impinge on economic enterprise ties many of these studies together into a methodological as well as a thematic unity.

Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence

Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence

Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence

To whom should we ascribe the great flowering of the arts in Renaissance Italy? Artists like Botticelli and Michelangelo? Or wealthy, discerning patrons like Cosimo de' Medici? In recent years, scholars have attributed great importance to the role played by patrons, arguing that some should even be regarded as artists in their own right. This approach receives sharp challenge in Jill Burke's Changing Patrons, a book that draws heavily upon the author's discoveries in Florentine archives, tracing the many profound transformations in patrons' relations to the visual world of fifteenth-century Florence. Looking closely at two of the city's upwardly mobile families, Burke demonstrates that they approached the visual arts from within a grid of social, political, and religious concerns. Art for them often served as a mediator of social difference and a potent means of signifying status and identity. Changing Patrons combines visual analysis with history and anthropology to propose new interpretations of the art created by, among others, Botticelli, Filippino Lippi, and Raphael. Genuinely interdisciplinary, the book also casts light on broad issues of identity, power relations, and the visual arts in Florence, the cradle of the Renaissance.

Quantitative Studies of the Renaissance Florentine Economy and Society

Quantitative Studies of the Renaissance Florentine Economy and Society

Quantitative Studies of the Renaissance Florentine Economy and Society is a collection of nine quantitative studies probing aspects of Renaissance Florentine economy and society. The collection, organized by topic, source material and analysis methods, discusses risk and return, specifically the population’s responses to the plague and also the measurement of interest rates. The work analyzes the population’s wealth distribution, the impact of taxes and subsidies on art and architecture, the level of neighborhood segregation and the accumulation of wealth. Additionally, this study assesses the competitiveness of Florentine markets and the level of monopoly power, the nature of women’s work and the impact of business risk on the organization of industrial production.

Renaissance Florence

A Social History

Renaissance Florence

An examination of the social history of Florence from the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries.

Renaissance Florence, Updated Edition

Renaissance Florence, Updated Edition

In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, the city of Florence experienced the most creative period in her entire history. This book is an in-depth analysis of that dynamic community, focusing primarily on the years 1380-1450 in an examination of the city's physical character, its economic and social structure and developments, its political and religious life, and its cultural achievement. For this edition, Mr. Brucker has added Notes on Florentine Scholarship and a Bibliographical Supplement.

The World of Renaissance Florence

The World of Renaissance Florence

Arte, politica, vita quotidiana nella culla del Rinascimento italiano. Dallo splendore dei Medici ai grandi maestri d'arte quali Botticelli, Michelangelo e Leonardo, il ritratto, interamente in inglese, di una città che ha cambiato la storia del mondo: Firenze. Annotation Supplied by Informazioni Editoriali