The Economic History of Latin America Since Independence

The Economic History of Latin America Since Independence

The Economic History of Latin America Since Independence tells the story of promise unfulfilled. Despite the region's abundance of natural resources and a favorable ratio of land to labor, not a single republic of Latin America has achieved the status of a developed country after nearly two cent uries free of colonial rule. If anything, the gap between living standards in Latin America and the developed countries has steadily widened since the early nineteenth century. Burdened with the legacy of colonialism and its unequal distribution of resources, Latin America is still a peripheral region in which external influences remain preeminent.

The Economic Development of Latin America Since Independence

The Economic Development of Latin America Since Independence

A comprehensive and accessible overview of the economic history of Latin America over the two centuries since Independence. It considers its principal problems and the main policy trends and covers external trade, economic growth, and inequality.

The Economic History of Latin America since Independence

The Economic History of Latin America since Independence

This revised and updated third edition contains a wealth of new material that draws on new research in this area.

The Cambridge Economic History of Latin America: Volume 2, The Long Twentieth Century

The Cambridge Economic History of Latin America: Volume 2, The Long Twentieth Century

Volume Two treats the 'long twentieth century' from the onset of modern economic growth to the present. It analyzes the principal dimensions of Latin America's first era of sustained economic growth from the last decades of the nineteenth century to 1930. It explores the era of inward-looking development from the 1930s to the collapse of import-substituting industrialization and the return to strategies of globalization in the 1980s. Finally, it looks at the long term trends in capital flows, agriculture and the environment.

Latin America since Independence

A History with Primary Sources

Latin America since Independence

What is Latin America, after all? While histories of the "other" Americas often link disparate histories through revolutionary or tragic narratives, Latin America since Independence begins with the assumption that our efforts to imagine a common past for nearly thirty countries are deeply problematic. Without losing sight of chronology or regional trends, this text offers glimpses of the Latin American past through carefully selected stories. Each chapter introduces students to a specific historical issue, which in turn raises questions about the history of the Americas as a whole. Key themes include: Race and Citizenship Inequality and Economic Development Politics and Rights Social and Cultural Movements Globalization Violence and Civil Society The short, thematic chapters are bolstered by the inclusion of relevant primary documents – many translated for the first time – including advertisements and posters, song lyrics, political speeches, government documents, and more. Each chapter also includes timelines highlighting important dates and suggestions for further reading. Richly informative and highly readable, Latin America since Independence provides compelling accounts of this region’s past and present. This second edition brings the story up to the present, with revised chapters, new primary documents and images, and a new ‘At A Glance’ feature that uses a selection of maps and tables to illuminate key issues like the economy, the environment, and demographics. For additional information and classroom resources please visit the Latin America since Independence companion website at www.routledge.com/cw/dawson.

Latin America's Economy

Diversity, Trends, and Conflicts

Latin America's Economy

This important new text provides a clear, comprehensive, and accessible overview ofmajor economic issues facing Latin America today, including balance of payments problems, inflation,stabilization, poverty, inequality, and land reform. It captures trends and common issues and at thesame time illustrates the diversity of national experiences.Each chapter centers around an economicproblem from such new topics as debt to more enduring issues like poverty and agrarian reform - andpresents major economic theories on the causes and solutions to the problem. Complex equations andformulas are omitted; instead, the discussion focuses on the underlying logic of contending policyprescriptions. Cardoso and Helwege provide numerous cross-country examples and tables to demonstratehow individual countries are affected differently by economic trends or policies, gradually buildinga sense of the complexity of the Latin American economy and the policy implications behind economicsolutions. Chapters also include helpful summaries and ideas on what the future may hold.Bothauthors are at Tufts University. Eliana Cardoso is Associate Professor at the Fletcher School of Lawand Diplomacy and Ann Helwege is Assistant Professor in the Department of Urban and EnvironmentalPolicy.

Latin America since Independence

Two Centuries of Continuity and Change

Latin America since Independence

This innovative text offers a clear and concise introduction to Latin America since independence. Thomas C. Wright traces continuity and change in five central colonial legacies: authoritarian governance; a rigid social hierarchy based on race, color, and gender; the powerful Roman Catholic Church; economic dependency; and the large landed estate. He shows that the outcomes of debate and contestation over these colonial legacies have been crucial in shaping contemporary political systems, economies, societies, and religious institutions in a richly diverse region. These unifying themes guide the reader through each period. The text’s user-friendly illustrations, maps, chapter summaries, and suggestions for further reading enrich student understanding of a major part of the world.

Early Latin America

A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil

Early Latin America

This book provides a general history of Latin America in the period between the European conquest and the gaining of independence by the Spanish American countries and Brazil (approximately 1492-1825). It is both an introduction for the student at the college level and a provisionally updated synthesis of the quickly changing field for the more experienced reader. The authors' aim is not only to treat colonial Brazil and colonial Spanish America in a single volume, something rarely done, but also to view early Latin America as one unit with a centre and peripheries, all parts of which were characterized by variants of the same kinds of change, regardless of national and imperial borders. The authors integrate both the older and the newer historical literature, seeing legal, institutional, and political phenomena within a social, economic, and cultural context. They incorporate insights from other disciplines and newer techniques of historical research, but eschew jargon or technical concepts. The approach of the book, with its emphasis on broad social and economic trends across large areas and long time periods, does much to throw light on Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well.