The Politics of Subversion

A Manifesto for the Twenty-First Century

The Politics of Subversion

In this important book, Antonio Negri develops the key ideas that were to form the basis for the highly influential analyses of new forms of power and social struggle presented in Empire and Multitude. He shows how new technology and the break-up of the traditional factory have created new social subjects whose value is no longer tied to their skill. The spread of communication networks and the globalization of production mean that capitalism has become totalized - but not, Negri stresses, monolithic. On the contrary, the possibilities for subversion have correspondingly increased. Going beyond classical Marxism, he shows how old solidarities must be reformulated and new alliances created. The struggles which marked the political end of the twentieth century are now being repeated in a new historical conjuncture, giving rise to new forms of transnational solidarity that can challenge dominant global powers. This new paperback edition, which includes a new Preface by the author, is an excellent introduction to the work of one of the most influential political thinkers writing today and will be essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand the new forms of conflict and struggle that will shape the world in the twenty-first century.

The Politics of Subversion

Civil Liberty and Lèse-majesté in the Modern Thai State

The Politics of Subversion


The politics of history

Aryan invasion theory and the subversion of scholarship

The politics of history


Smuggling as Subversion

Colonialism, Indian Merchants, and the Politics of Opium, 1790-1843

Smuggling as Subversion

Smuggling as Subversion is the first comprehensive account of the opium industry in western India during the colonial period, from its beginnings to the mid-19th century. This is an in-depth examination of the use of opium during colonial times, and at the same time the fascinating story of how Indian merchants developed a smuggling enterprise that subverted the East India Company's monopoly in the drug, setting in motion a chain of events that led to the first Opium War in China.

Writing the Politics of Difference

Writing the Politics of Difference

This book addresses various phases of continental philosophy, both in the context of its multiple traditions and in relation to the alternatives that mark the understanding of its present and future. Divided into two parts, the authors first focus on the diversity of traditions in continental philosophy in connection with the texts of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and De Beauvoir. Second, they explore the reality of social, political, sexual, and philosophical differences, in connection with the writings of Merleau-Ponty, Arendt, Habermas, Heidegger, Foucault, Irigaray, Kristeva, Derrida, and Vattimo. They also stress the various theoretical foundations that manifest these differences. Issues surrounding the role of philosophical systems, language, ethical choice, relations with others, the gendered body, socialization, and the status of philosophy today constitute the fabric of this book. The authors place these ideas in the context of current thought and current debates in continental philosophy and evaluate their significance for the future.

Resisting Militarism

Direct Action and the Politics of Subversion

Resisting Militarism

An intimate study of imaginative, highly passionate, subversive and often mischievous world of British anti-militarist activists In the past 15 years, UK anti-militarist activists have auctioned off a tank outside an arms fair, superglued themselves to Lockheed Martin's central London offices and stopped a battleship with a canoe. They have also challenged militarism in many other everyday ways. This book explores why anti-militarists resist, considers the politics of different tactics and examines the tensions and debates within the movement. As it explores the multifaceted, imaginative and highly subversive world of anti-militarism, the book also makes two overarching arguments. First, that anti-militarists can help us to understand militarism in new and useful ways. And secondly, that the methods and ideas used by anti-militarists can be a potent force for radical political change.

Feminist Aesthetics and the Politics of Modernism

Feminist Aesthetics and the Politics of Modernism

Ewa Ziarek fully articulates a feminist aesthetics, focusing on the struggle for freedom in women's literary and political modernism and the devastating impact of racist violence and sexism. She examines the contradiction between women's transformative literary and political practices and the oppressive realities of racist violence and sexism, and she situates these tensions within the entrenched opposition between revolt and melancholia in studies of modernity and within the friction between material injuries and experimental aesthetic forms. Ziarek's political and aesthetic investigations concern the exclusion and destruction of women in politics and literary production and the transformation of this oppression into the inaugural possibilities of writing and action. Her study is one of the first to combine an in-depth engagement with philosophical aesthetics, especially the work of Theodor W. Adorno, with women's literary modernism, particularly the writing of Virginia Woolf and Nella Larsen, along with feminist theories on the politics of race and gender. By bringing seemingly apolitical, gender-neutral debates about modernism's experimental forms together with an analysis of violence and destroyed materialities, Ziarek challenges both the anti-aesthetic subordination of modern literature to its political uses and the appreciation of art's emancipatory potential at the expense of feminist and anti-racist political struggles.

The Politics of Antipolitics

The Military in Latin America

The Politics of Antipolitics

Latin America is moving toward democracy. The region's countries hold elections, choose leaders, and form new governments. But is the civilian government firmly in power? Or is the military still influencing policy and holding the elected politicians in check under the guise of guarding against corruption, instability, economic uncertainty, and other excesses of democracy? The editors of this work, Brian Loveman and Thomas M. Davies, Jr., argue that with or without direct military rule, antipolitics persists as a foundation of Latin American politics. This study examines the origins of antipolitics, traces its nineteenth- and twentieth-century history, and focuses on the years from 1965 to 1995 to emphasize the somewhat illusory transitions to democracy. This third edition of The Politics of Antipolitics has been revised and updated to focus on the post-Cold War era. With the demise of the Soviet state and international Marxism, the Latin American military has appropriated new threats including narcoterrorism, environmental exploitation, technology transfer, and even AIDS to redefine and relegitimate its role in social, economic, and political policy. The editors also address why and how the military rulers acceded to the return of civilian-elected governments and the military's defense against accusations of human rights abuses.

Security, Emancipation and the Politics of Health

A New Theoretical Perspective

Security, Emancipation and the Politics of Health

This book develops a new theoretical framework for the study of security issues and applies this to the case of health. Building on the work of the ‘Welsh School’ of Security Studies, and drawing on contributions from the wider critical security literature, the book provides an emancipatory perspective on the health-security nexus – one which simultaneously teases out its underlying political assumptions, assesses its political effects and identifies potential for transformation. Security, Emancipation and the Politics of Health challenges conventional wisdom in the field of health and international politics by conceiving of health as a fundamentally political issue, and not merely as a medical problem demanding ‘technical’ solutions and arrangements. The book shows how political processes of representation underpin notions of health and disease through an examination of three key areas: the linkages between immigration and the fear of disease; colonial medicine; and the ‘health as a bridge for peace’ literature. In order to successfully carry out this political investigation of health, the book develops an innovative theoretical framework inspired by the idea of ‘security as emancipation’, which goes beyond the existing emancipatory literature in security studies. This book will be of much interest to students of critical security studies, health politics, sociology and IR in general.

The Politics of Voice

Liberalism and Social Criticism from Franklin to Kingston

The Politics of Voice

This book is an analysis of the social criticism and the political implications of rhetorical strategies in personal-political (nonfictional) narratives by liberal American writers from the 18th century till the 1970s. Using the theories of Mikhail Bakhtin, Schueller examines works by Benjamin Franklin, Henry David Thoreau, Henry James, Henry Adams, Jane Addams, James Agee, Norman Mailer, and Maxine Hong Kingston.