The Southern Planter

The Factor and the Banker

The Southern Planter


The Southern Planter, Vol. 1

Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, and the Household Arts; September, 1841 (Classic Reprint)

The Southern Planter, Vol. 1

Excerpt from The Southern Planter, Vol. 1: Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, and the Household Arts; September, 1841 I am careful to keep a good fire burning in the cellar, with the windows open, whilst I am sorting and packing, that I may drive off the dampness created by the potatoes themselves. After the bank is completed, and begins to heat, I cast over the top a little sand, which soon be comes dry from the heat of the bank, when I move a broom lightly over the top, displacing the sand and causing. It to fall into the bank. This is repeated three or four times, as the heat ing may require, after which, I leave a thin coat on the top as a winter covering. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Southern Planter, Vol. 4

Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, and the Household Arts; October, 1844 (Classic Reprint)

The Southern Planter, Vol. 4

Excerpt from The Southern Planter, Vol. 4: Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, and the Household Arts; October, 1844 For three years we have published from time to time experiments and statements showing the value of the saltpetre soak for corn and other seeds, and yet probably not one tenth of our readers use this or any other soak. For several years we have soaked all Our corn with the most gratifying results. None of it has ever been touched by the grub, against which we, there fore, regard the saltpetre as a perfect protection, and it grows with a rapidity that shames the sluggishness of grass and weeds. We planted some corn this year, 011 the 61h of May, soaked as usual, and in just twenty eight days it stood twenty-two inches high - ground rich but not manured this year A pound of saltpetre in enough water to cover a bushel of corn is about the proportion. - Louisville Journal. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Southern Planter, Vol. 20

Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, and the Household Arts; December, 1860 (Classic Reprint)

The Southern Planter, Vol. 20

Excerpt from The Southern Planter, Vol. 20: Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, and the Household Arts; December, 1860 Which is as good as two dollars. N ow, \if you have as good a sled as mine, made, it Nail} cost you at least twelve dollars. You see how these little things count And all this comes of your having tools to work with, returned Jones, whose eyes were beginning to Open. Yes, neighbor. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The British Gentry, the Southern Planter, and the Northern Family Farmer

Agriculture and Sectional Antagonism in North America

The British Gentry, the Southern Planter, and the Northern Family Farmer

Drawing on the history of the British gentry to explain the contrasting sentiments of American small farmers and plantation owners, James L. Huston's expansive analysis offers a new understanding of the socioeconomic factors that fueled sectionalism and ignited the American Civil War. This groundbreaking study of agriculture's role in the war defies long-held notions that northern industrialization and urbanization led to clashes between North and South. Rather, Huston argues that the ideological chasm between plantation owners in the South and family farmers in the North led to the political eruption of 1854-56 and the birth of a sectionalized party system. Huston shows that over 70 percent of the northern population-by far the dominant economic and social element-had close ties to agriculture. More invested in egalitarianism and personal competency than in capitalism, small farmers in the North operated under a free labor ideology that emphasized the ideals of independence and mastery over oneself. The ideology of the plantation, by contrast, reflected the conservative ethos of the British aristocracy, which was the product of immense landed inequality and the assertion of mastery over others. By examining the dominant populations in northern and southern congressional districts, Huston reveals that economic interests pitted the plantation South against the small-farm North. The northern shift toward Republicanism depended on farmers, not industrialists: While Democrats won the majority of northern farm congressional districts from 1842 to 1853, they suffered a major defection of these districts from 1854 to 1856, to the antislavery organizations that would soon coalesce into the Republican Party. Utilizing extensive historical research and close examination of the voting patterns in congressional districts across the country, James Huston provides a remarkable new context for the origins of the Civil War.