The Subject of Semiotics

The Subject of Semiotics

This provocative book undertakes a new and challenging reading of recent semiotic and structuralist theory, arguing that films, novels, and poems cannot be studied in isolation from their viewers and readers.

The Subject of Semiotics

The Subject of Semiotics

This provocative book undertakes a new and challenging reading of recent semiotic and structuralist theory, arguing that films, novels, and poems cannot be studied in isolation from their viewers and readers.

The Subject of Semiotics

The Subject of Semiotics

This provocative book undertakes a new and challenging reading of recent semiotic and structuralist theory, arguing that films, novels, and poems cannot be studied in isolation from their viewers and readers.

A Theory of Semiotics

A Theory of Semiotics

Provides a theory of codes and a theory of sign production and discusses communication and signification

Lacan and the subject of law

toward a psychoanalytic critical legal theory

Lacan and the subject of law


The Subject of Violence

The Song of Roland and the Birth of the State

The Subject of Violence

"This book provides the reader with a new, challenging, and sophisticated critical analysis of the Song of Roland." -- Choice "[Haidu's] close reading of the Song of Roland is interesting, informative, and significant... " -- American Historical Review "Probably the most sophisticated book ever written on the Song of Roland.... It is at once a work of linguistic analysis, of literary theory, of literary history, and, finally, of history." -- R. Howard Bloch Haidu argues that the 12th-century Song of Roland played an essential role in the creation of the nation-state, in that the narrative transforms the independent and violent warriors of the feudal period into the subordinate instruments of the nation-state by enforcing on them the subjection to the rule of monarchy.

On the Subject of Drama

On the Subject of Drama

Although much has been written on how the drama elements of the English curriculum might be taught in schools, there is less guidance available for teachers who regard drama not as an adjunct of English but as an arts subject in its own right. In this volume, David Hornbrook and a team of experienced drama specialists show how the subject of drama may be defined and taught. Drawing on literature, visual art, music and dance as well as the rich and varied traditions of drama itself, they map out an eclectic subject curriculum for students of all ages. Opening up the field in new and exciting ways, the book embraces the widest possible range of dramatic knowledge and skills, from the Natyashastra of ancient India to contemporary classroom improvisation. The book is divided into three sections: The teaching and learning of drama: ideas about interculturalism, creativity and craft - key concepts informing the drama curriculum - are interrogated and re-theorised for the classroom. Making and performing drama in school: the fundamental processes of reading and writing plays for performance are explored, along with the potential of dance to enhance and extend students' experience of dramatic performance. Watching and understanding drama: ensuring the curriculum is appropriately balanced between the production and reception of drama, this last section emphasises the role of students as audience - for both live and electronic performances - and the development of a dramatic vocabulary.

Jacques Lacan

Psychoanalysis and the Subject of Literature

Jacques Lacan

Lacan's critique of 'applied pscyhoanalysis' (especially in the domain of literary studies) entails a new practice of psychoanalysis understood as a type of textual reading of the Unconscious."--Jacket.

Classics of Semiotics

Classics of Semiotics

This book is designed to usher the reader into the realm of semiotic studies. It analyzes the most important approaches to semiotics as they have developed over the last hundred years out of philosophy, linguistics, psychology, and biology. As a science of sign processes, semiotics investigates all types of com munication and information exchange among human beings, animals, plants, internal systems of organisms, and machines. Thus it encompasses most of the subject areas of the arts and the social sciences, as well as those of biology and medicine. Semiotic inquiry into the conditions, functions, and structures of sign processes is older than anyone scientific discipline. As a result, it is able to make the underlying unity of these disciplines apparent once again without impairing their function as specializations. Semiotics is, above all, research into the theoretical foundations of sign oriented disciplines: that is, it is General Semiotics. Under the name of Zei chenlehre, it has been pursued in the German-speaking countries since the age of the Enlightenment. During the nineteenth century, the systematic inquiry into the functioning of signs was superseded by historical investigations into the origins of signs. This opposition was overcome in the first half of the twentieth century by American Semiotic as well as by various directions of European structuralism working in the tradition of Semiology. Present-day General Semiot ics builds on all these developments.

The Subject of Art in Process

Undressing the Emperor's Nude Clothes

The Subject of Art in Process

The Subject of Art in Process not only sets out to construct a new visual-based paradigm, one that attempts to address the vast array of complexities facing today's artists, but perhaps, more importantly, it opens the door to a possible Renewed Art Education. The Subject of Art in Process introduces IIAE (InterActive InterDisciplinary Art Education), an orientation grounded in the practice of inner image/outer image fluency of individual subjects engaged as members in a community of voices and as activators, inter-activators, and retro-activators, and, in particular, selfTeachers (intra-activators), in a community of voices that share interDiscliplinary knowledge.